Wellsville schools opt for catering consulting | News, Sports, Jobs

The Wellsville Tiger mascot poses with friends Tuesday afternoon during a photo opportunity at the school district’s back-to-school party behind the high school. In addition to hot dogs, popcorn and sno-cones, the event included inflatables and games as well as various vendors and agencies in addition to representation from the village security forces. Students return to class next week. (Review Special/Stephanie Ujhelyi)

WELLSVILLE — School board members decided to trust the instincts of their superintendent Richard Bereschik, who was betting that a food service consulting firm could turn around the district’s struggling lunch program. However, the decision was far from unanimous.

During the Wellsville School District’s regular 90-minute meeting, members signed a contract with the nutrition group to run the district’s program, after asking businesses to submit proposals on setting up a program in accordance with the guidelines of the Ohio Department of Education’s Nutrition Division. Board members Gary Althiser, John Morrow and Rick Salsberry voted in favor of the measure, while fellow board members Chris Amato and Austin Dalrymple abstained, resulting in its passage.

The latest Columbiana County district to sign a contract with the Nutrition Group, Bereschik said he believed East Liverpool was the only one resisting.

Ohio Association of Public School Employees (OAPSE) spokesman Ed Swogger voiced his opposition to the move, which was expected to cost the district $100,000 a year with only a $1,400 profit projected under the proposal. of the company.

Bereschik said the $100,000 contract only includes $10,000 in profit for the group while the remaining $10,000 funds administrative costs and food purchases.

Another photo op for the Wellsville Tiger mascot as he poses with an unidentified village youth and his fire hat during the school district’s back to school on Tuesday afternoon as a tiger bounce house appears in background. In addition to hot dogs, popcorn, and ice cream cones, the event included a variety of inflatables and games for families to stop by. Various traders and agencies also participated in the event as well as the village security forces. (Special for The Review/Stephanie Ujhelyi)

He said two years ago he and board chairman Althiser visited the company’s Salem School System operation to see it in action and were impressed with what they saw. . Not only has the nutrition group improved the profits of the Salem Schools Cafeteria, but it has also provided innovative yet delicious meals to students and staff. For example, around this time, representatives from the Salem school detailed how they made $300,000 in profit in their program that year under the leadership of the Nutrition Group.

The superintendent speculated that the change will not only increase their profitability, but will also increase student participation, which is currently around 78%.

For as long as they can remember, Wellsville officials have become accustomed to supplementing money for the district’s food service program, which includes breakfast and lunch, from the general fund. That may have been until last year, when Wellsville received more money (88 cents for lunch and 25 cents for breakfast) than it received due to the pandemic. However, this additional funding has been phased out for the upcoming school year.

But instead, the district will be reimbursed an additional 49 cents per lunch.

Having the nutrition group on board will also allow them to provide dinners for groups like student-athletes before a game or meet up and get an even bigger refund.

Lt. Marsha Eisenhart’s Wellsville Police cruiser is parked in the foreground of the Wellsville Tigers gang bus in a rear parking lot. It was draining water during the district’s back-to-school Tuesday afternoon behind the high school. The Wellsville Fire Department had also brought in a ladder truck to display during the festivities and handed out firefighter hats. The event included a variety of inflatables and games as well as various vendors and agencies that participated. Wellsville had not held the event since the pandemic, according to Superintendent Richard Bereschik. (Special for The Review/Stephanie Ujhelyi)

Bereschik asked the council to trust him for at least a year to see how the district fared. He viewed the $20,000 risk as a gamble he was willing to take, especially when he assumed that hiring a full-time in-house administrator/manager would cost $80,000 with salary and benefits.

It’s a one-year, at-will deal with an escape clause allowing either party to opt out with 90 days’ notice.

Dalrymple and Amato both had questions after listening to Swogger’s speech and were unhappy with the answers, especially since they would like to see more financial benefits.

Although he couldn’t offer anyone any guarantees, the measure passed by a simple majority and Bereschik still stands by his decision to back the decision.

In other actions, board members also:

Melissa Galbreath of the Columbiana County Educational Services Center helps Rowen Mason, 4, of East Liverpool, with a Turtle Rescue frame game during the Wellsville School District’s back to school on Tuesday afternoon. The children, who managed to throw a stuffed turtle into the hole, won candy as a prize. Galbreath was with Family and Children First, while Mason will attend preschool with Kiducation in Wellsville. In addition to hot dogs, popcorn, and ice cream cones, the event included a variety of inflatables and games for families to stop by. Various traders and agencies also participated in the event as well as the village security forces. (Special for The Review/Stephanie Ujhelyi)

— Accepted the resignation of assistant cook Regina Kupsky;

– Approved Magic Moments as the new school photographer and tentative bus schedule for the 2022-2023 school year;

— Donations accepted from Martin-MacLean-Altmeyer and Roberts funeral homes, Better Homes USA Ltd., Wellsville Care and Share, Marathon Gas; and Drs. Moore and Kohler at the district’s back-to-school party held Tuesday night;

–Approved fifth and sixth graders to go to Camp Fitch Sept. 7-9 with volunteer chaperones/parents Lisa Smith, Tracy Kosek, Joe Shimmel, Anne Cartwright, Candy Craig, Lindsay Clifton, Terry Foden, Beth Roberts, Mandy Corbin, Kelly Dalrymple, Erin Orr, Kayla Reese, Natalie Mathess, Mikelle Williams and Amanda Winston, Jace Cartwright and Hayden Dalrymple;

– Also approved a March 23-26 field trip to Nashville, Tenn., for the high school choir with accompanists Aaron Bunfill, Lori Traina, Katey Lora, Jonathan Kinkead, Lindsay Clifton, Dana Pucci and Rachel Dieringer;

The Wellsville Tiger mascot takes the opportunity to meet friends in front of the tiger’s bounce house, which was set up behind the Wellsville High School campus during a back-to-school party on Tuesday afternoon. In addition to hot dogs, popcorn, and ice cream cones, the event included a variety of inflatables and games for families to stop by. Various traders and agencies also participated in the event as well as the village security forces. (Special for The Review/Stephanie Ujhelyi)

— Hiring of Tricia Guglielmo, intervention specialist; Mitchell McDowell, fourth grade teacher; and Camryn Jackson, a short-lived paraprofessional.

– Approved Shelbie Householder and Marie Martin as Junior Class Advisors and Alaina Kilpatrick to oversee Federal Programs (CCIP).

– The board also approved the following replacements Pat Persohn, Terri Flint, Tina Smith, Ann Chamberlain, Nick Bayer, Jerry Barnes, John Bryan, Linda Lonkert, Mattisyn Infanti, Pat McNicol, Nicholas Talbott, Zach Kinsey, Brenda Brush, Nickole Sears , Joni Bergert, David Thompson, Mark Jones, Kinsey Woodward and Susan Mackey.

— John Morrow was nominated as a delegate to the Ohio School Board Capital Conference by his colleagues and Rick Salsberry as an alternate.

Board members also approved a resolution that would allow them to employ substitute teachers with a one-year non-bachelor temporary substitute teaching license obtained through the Ohio Department of Education, effective of September 23. Bereschik still stresses the importance of the teacher who achieves status through the traditional method being privileged, said surrogates in this way can only substitute 60 days under this resolution;

The Columbiana County Educational Services Center would also be contracted for technology services in the upcoming school year.

The new regular Wellsville School Board meeting is set for 6:30 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 19 at the high school media center.


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